What 2017 Has Brought for Seniors, Veterans and Persons with Disabilities

It has been a year packed with activity on the presidential and congressional level. We have seen proposed, amended and failed legislation, blocked executive orders, investigations, and charges of collusion on both sides. In this issue, we will summarize how developments from 2017 are likely to impact seniors, Veterans, and persons with disabilities. What Happened with Health Care? 2017 saw multiple attempts by Read More

Driving Mobility Affects Seniors’ Social Lives, Overall Health

According to a recent study, elderly drivers who stop driving and have no transportation alternatives become less socially active and risk isolation. This can lead to a decline in both physical and mental health. Teja Pristavec, a sociology researcher at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ, sought to determine the effect of driving mobility on the social participation of older Americans. Her results were Read More

Can Poor Sleep Increase Your Risk of Alzheimer’s?

You may already know that not getting enough good sleep can cause daytime sleepiness, an inability to make good decisions, car and other accidents, unhealthy food choices, weight gain, depression, high blood pressure, diabetes and a host of other health problems. But could poor sleep increase your risk of Alzheimer’s, too? Three recent studies are pointing us in that direction. In this issue of The ElderCounselor, Read More

Helping Veterans Pay for Long Term Care

There are currently over 25 million veterans alive in the United States. There are over 9 million surviving spouses of veterans currently living in the United States. Many of these veterans and surviving spouses are receiving long term care or will need some type of long term care in the near future, and there are funds available from the Veterans Administration ("VA") to help pay for that care. Unfortunately, many Read More

Why We Fail to Plan for Long-Term Care

Most Americans do not know, or refuse to accept, the facts surrounding their potential need for long-term care and the costs associated with it.  This was reconfirmed recently in a telephone survey of 1,735 Americans over the age of 40, funded by the SCAN Foundation and conducted by the Associated Press (AP) – NORC Center for Public Affairs Research (“survey”).[1]  This survey highlights many of the misconceptions Read More

The Value of Using Irrevocable Trusts in Medicaid Planning

People often wonder about the value of using irrevocable trusts in Medicaid planning. Certainly gifting of assets can be done outright, not involving an irrevocable trust. Outright gifts have the advantages of being simple to do with minimal costs involved, including the cost of preparing and recording deeds and the cost of preparing and filing a gift tax return. Many financial institutions have their own documents Read More

The First 100 Days and The New Health Care Bill: What They Mean for Seniors, Veterans and the Disabled

Much has been made of the first 100 days of President Trump’s administration, and of the American Health Care Act (AHCA). This bill was just passed by the House as the first step to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This issue of The ElderCounselor™ will highlight the activity of the President’s first 100+ days and the potential effects on seniors, veterans and the disabled. President Trump’s Read More

The Costs of Dementia: For the Patient and the Family

A recent report from the Alzheimer’s Association states that one in nine Americans age 65 or older currently have Alzheimer’s. With the baby boomer generation aging and people living longer, that number may nearly triple by 2050. Alzheimer’s, of course, is just one cause of dementia—mini-strokes (TIAs) are also to blame—so the number of those with dementia may actually be higher. Caring for someone with dementia Read More

Medical Professionals, Elder Law Attorneys and Their Older Patient/Clients All Benefit When the Professionals Work Together

There are often situations in which an older person needs the services of an attorney and medical professionals. A recent article in Bifocal, a publication of the American Bar Association, highlighted six scenarios in which such a collaboration would be beneficial to the older patient-client’s well-being, as well as the professionals. This issue of ElderCounselor will summarize these situations. Decisional Read More

Top Reasons Everyone Needs a Comprehensive Power of Attorney

The benefits of a highly detailed, comprehensive power of attorney are numerous. Unfortunately, many powers of attorney are more general in nature and can actually cause more problems than they solve, especially for our senior population. This issue of the ElderCounselor highlights the benefits of a comprehensive, detailed power of attorney, including some of the provisions that should be included. A proper starting Read More