Underestimating the Risk of Disability – The Importance of Being Prepared

No one likes to think about the possibility of their own disability or the disability of a loved one. However, as the statistics below demonstrate, we should all plan for at least a temporary disability. This issue of The ElderCounselor TM examines the eye-opening statistics surrounding disability and some of the common disability planning options. Disability planning is one area where we can give each and every Read More

How Will Tax Reform Impact Seniors and Persons with Disabilities?

The Tax Cut and Jobs Act (TCJA) is now officially law. Both the House and Senate passed the new tax reform bill in December with straight party-line votes and no support from Democrats. President Trump signed it into law right before Christmas. It is the first overhaul of the tax code in more than 30 years. In this issue of The Elder Counselor, we will mostly look at how this tax law is likely to impact seniors Read More

The Importance of Adequate Intake of Fluids

By the National Care Planning Council Dehydration – failure to consume adequate fluids to replace those that are lost – is a major problem for the elderly. About 10% of all hospitalizations are directly attributable to dehydration. Seniors are particularly susceptible to becoming dehydrated. It can even result in death if severe enough. As we age our bodies store less water. This is because muscle mass Read More

What 2017 Has Brought for Seniors, Veterans and Persons with Disabilities

It has been a year packed with activity on the presidential and congressional level. We have seen proposed, amended and failed legislation, blocked executive orders, investigations, and charges of collusion on both sides. In this issue, we will summarize how developments from 2017 are likely to impact seniors, Veterans, and persons with disabilities. What Happened with Health Care? 2017 saw multiple attempts by Read More

Driving Mobility Affects Seniors’ Social Lives, Overall Health

According to a recent study, elderly drivers who stop driving and have no transportation alternatives become less socially active and risk isolation. This can lead to a decline in both physical and mental health. Teja Pristavec, a sociology researcher at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ, sought to determine the effect of driving mobility on the social participation of older Americans. Her results were Read More

Can Poor Sleep Increase Your Risk of Alzheimer’s?

You may already know that not getting enough good sleep can cause daytime sleepiness, an inability to make good decisions, car and other accidents, unhealthy food choices, weight gain, depression, high blood pressure, diabetes and a host of other health problems. But could poor sleep increase your risk of Alzheimer’s, too? Three recent studies are pointing us in that direction. In this issue of The ElderCounselor, Read More

Helping Veterans Pay for Long Term Care

There are currently over 25 million veterans alive in the United States. There are over 9 million surviving spouses of veterans currently living in the United States. Many of these veterans and surviving spouses are receiving long term care or will need some type of long term care in the near future, and there are funds available from the Veterans Administration ("VA") to help pay for that care. Unfortunately, many Read More

Why We Fail to Plan for Long-Term Care

Most Americans do not know, or refuse to accept, the facts surrounding their potential need for long-term care and the costs associated with it.  This was reconfirmed recently in a telephone survey of 1,735 Americans over the age of 40, funded by the SCAN Foundation and conducted by the Associated Press (AP) – NORC Center for Public Affairs Research (“survey”).[1]  This survey highlights many of the misconceptions Read More

The Value of Using Irrevocable Trusts in Medicaid Planning

People often wonder about the value of using irrevocable trusts in Medicaid planning. Certainly gifting of assets can be done outright, not involving an irrevocable trust. Outright gifts have the advantages of being simple to do with minimal costs involved, including the cost of preparing and recording deeds and the cost of preparing and filing a gift tax return. Many financial institutions have their own documents Read More

The First 100 Days and The New Health Care Bill: What They Mean for Seniors, Veterans and the Disabled

Much has been made of the first 100 days of President Trump’s administration, and of the American Health Care Act (AHCA). This bill was just passed by the House as the first step to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This issue of The ElderCounselor™ will highlight the activity of the President’s first 100+ days and the potential effects on seniors, veterans and the disabled. President Trump’s Read More